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a fantastic read Wrestling has taught me a number of different life lessons. It taught me discipline, time management, and having the pride always do the best that I can do, in everything I do.

junior | PITMAN

https://entiredigital.com/56204-dte76692-playthroughs-of-adult-dating-soms.html Allow him to re-introduce himself, his name is Iz Zee. I – Z – Z – Y. 113 better be ready for this guy. Fresh outta Pitman ready for action. Take first in the state, they askin what happened? Was supposed to be a showdown of Selma, Buchanan. Then Izzy left em Dizzy. Boom. Like two cannons.

Now, if you didn’t read that and flow to the beat of Jay-Z’s Public Service Announcement, I don’t think we can be friends. If you’ve never even http://lolieward.com/prinivil heard the song, then read the rest of this (of course) and then go find that on Youtube. Anyway, I thought it was fitting to start this off with a bang (pun intended) and that just stood out to me because the story of Izzy Tubera might be best viewed through the lens of “making a comeback” or in the words of Sean Carter, introducing oneself all over again. You didn’t forget, did you? Well, here he is to remind you again.

Two years ago, a freshman from Pitman burst into the state tournament and placed 7th – compared to a seed of 11 – it’s safe to say even then he exceeded expectations. He racked off three wins to open the tournament, before falling to eventual state champion Prata by a score of 3-1. Say what? That close to the semis. That close to the noise heard through those first three rounds becoming deafening. Becoming destiny. It wasn’t quite meant to be, but still, 7th in a state as deep as CA, nothing to sneeze at. Salud!

Early success can be a blessing and a curse and not everyone, especially 14 or 15 year old athletes, are mature enough to handle it. To have to face adversity and push through it. They have to stumble and refocus. Clarity. Like driving through the fog on a mountain road. Going too fast, can lead to spin outs or derailments. Respond. It’s a funny thing about wrestling – maybe unique to it? (I’ve been around a ton of athletes and wrestlers just tick a little differently) – it’s an immediate teacher. Humility. You train and you practice. You prepare and you prepare. And in six minutes, the tree of results bears fruit. Wonderful, succulent fruit. Delicious. Or. Always an “or”. The fruit smacks you in the face with its bitterness and leaves you humble, licking your wounds. But you start to love it. You start to feed off it. You need it. The competition. The tests. And the fog starts to lift. Clarity.

That clarity is what drives Tubera, certainly this year, and probably beyond. He’s focused, anxious. Remember him. Again.

He’s always thought he could one day compete here, at Baskersfield, for a state title. He remembers coming purchase Pregabalin that close two years ago, and he’s not going to let this opportunity slip away. He’s studied on the competition, knowing the quality of his weight class this season. “I wrestled Lujan in 8th grade. Lost by 2. But I can’t think of them yet. I’m just focused on each match, doing what I do best. In the end, it’s nothing but respect for my opponent, win or lose.” Respect. For the wrestling community: the opponents that test Tubera and the circle of influence who has shaped him to this point.

introduced to the sport at a young age, Tubera was a natural. Not a natural fan of the sport, he says he “had to learn to love it. But now, it’s a way of life.” A lifestyle supported by his parents, friends and family, and his coaches. All of whom he credits for getting him to this place, mentally and physically. Rising to the occasion and digging to deep within himself to perform at his best. They have never given up on him, and that has instilled the confidence in Tubera to not give up on himself. Anticipation.

The week leading up to Bakersfield is one of fine tuning and tweaking. Riding with what got him here. Often, a team or individual reaches a high point and they get conservative, passive. Don’t expect that from Izzy. Izzy get em dizzy. He says he enjoys watching Austin DeSanto (current 133 for the Iowa Hawkeyes). And if that is after whom he patterns his style, that means neck-breaking pace, action on his feet. A pace that not everyone is ready to mimic. A pace that he prepares for with the same routine every time. Music. Blasting. The world. Silence. Go hard. Be smart. Six minutes. It’s his.

Bakersfield, get ready. The Izzy (Tub)Era starts now.

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